Tag Archives: student learning

Create Fun Polls and Quizzes with Riddle

Riddle is a FREE web-based tool that allows users to create opinion polls, lists, quizzes, and personality tests.  If you’re familiar with Buzzfeed (your students will be), Riddle allows you to create similar quizzes.  It’s a fun and simple formative assessment tool to engage students, gather their opinions, and gauge their understanding. Cool features of […]

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Energize In-Class Discussions

Last week, I was commiserating with an instructor about her struggle to engage students in discussion during class.  “Sometimes it’s like talking to a brick wall,” she lamented.  Facilitating lively conversations that require students to apply, synthesize, and evaluate their knowledge is one of the most challenging aspects of teaching.  Even the most brilliant lecturer […]

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Using Canva and Haiku Deck in the classroom

Back on February 4th, 2015 TLT posted our Top Ten Tech Tools and for today’s post I would like to highlight two of those tools, Canva and Haiku Deck , and share a few ways to use them in the classroom.  Both are free, easy to use, and rely on images instead of a lot of text.  Here are […]

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Strategies for Drama-Free Team Projects

Effective collaboration is a foundational skill that is taught as early as kindergarten.  By the time students reach college, one would think they would be expert team players.  Unfortunately, any professor can tell you that’s not usually true.  Students struggle to communicate competently, schedule meeting times, and manage conflict.  This often leads to tearful office […]

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Quick Audience Feedback with GoSoapBox

If you’ve ever asked your students “are there any questions?” you’ve likely received blank stares and shrugs.  Assuming this to mean everyone understands the content, you move on.  But what if students aren’t sure how to articulate what they don’t understand?  Or what if they’re too shy or embarrassed to admit they are confused?  Or […]

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Padagogy Wheel

At the 2015 Teaching Professor Conference one of the sessions I attended was Topping Out on Bloom:Technology for Student Projects led by Ike Shibley. I found it to be very helpful when thinking about a technology assignment that encourages students to use Bloom’s.  Below is a link to Dr. Shibley’s Obstacles/Opportunities table, questions for analysis […]

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Guest Post: Improving Exam Scores with Practice Poll Everywhere Questions

Our guest blogger this week is Dr. Kristin Krantzman from the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry. Dr. Krantzman attended the Faculty Technology Institute in 2014. In this post, Dr. Krantzman recounts her experiences using Poll Everywhere to provide students with opportunities to work on practice problems during class.   Poll Everywhere is a program that […]

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The Importance of Public Speaking

The belief that people fear public speaking more than death has become so readily accepted that Jerry Seinfeld’s joke about preferring to be in the coffin than giving the eulogy is now cliché.  Unfortunately, this fear prevents us from honing our oratory skills since we typically recoil from opportunities to practice.  But practice we must! […]

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Designing with Accessibility in Mind, Part 1: The Theory

We have reached that glorious time of year when students are starting to plan for the future (i.e. – register for Fall semester).  As we wrap up the current academic year, you may start thinking about the future yourself.  What courses will I be teaching next year? How will I do that? What assessments am […]

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Preparing for the Unexpected

On Tuesday, the College of Charleston experienced a safety and communication crisis when a bomb threat was made.  Classes in six buildings were officially cancelled and many faculty, staff, and students were prohibited from accessing their offices, classrooms, and dorms until 5:00PM.  This unexpected disruption caused many professors to lose valuable class time. As the […]

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