One of my favorite pastimes is reading.  It has become a family joke that my book obsession will land us in the poorhouse, but at least we’ll be well-read!  It was no surprise that when the Amazon Kindle was announced that I was one of the first to purchase the eReader.  My best friend, who is as voracious a reader as I am, also jumped on the eReader bandwagon with the Nook from Barnes and Noble.  It wasn’t long before we discovered an issue.  How can I share digital media from my Kindle to her Nook and vice versa?

Sharing eBooks from Devices

The first think to look at whether or not the book can be lend according to the publisher.  You can view this by looking at the product details for the Lending Enabled information:

Lending Enabled Information

Lending Enabled Information

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If the book is available for lending, and you already own this book, you can go to manage my digital media on the Amazon.com or barnesandnoble.com page and lend the book from your own online library.  For a tutorial on lending from the Amazon Kindle to the Barnes and Noble Nook, please click here.  For a tutorial on lending from the Barnes and Noble Nook to the Amazon Kindle, please click here.

The recipient will receive an email stating that you are being lent a book by [the lender] and if you do not have the corresponding device you can follow the prompts to download an application to your computer or mobile device.  This application is free and will allow you to read books in the digital format from the cloud with all of the same functionality of the device itself.  For example, you can highlight, make notes, search the document or web for key terms, and have unfamiliar words defined for you.  The eBook will be on loan to the recipient for a period of 14 days.  When the 14 days has expired, the eBook will return to the lender and be erased from the recipient’s application and archive.

Sharing your Digital Library

Sharing your Digital Library

Aspects to Consider

One of the big draws of the eBook platforms is the functionality and ability to interact with the text at large.  When a book is lent, it is lent as a clean slate.  All of the lender’s highlights and notes will not be visible to the recipient.  While an eBook is in the recipient’s possession, they can alter the format, make highlights, and take notes within the text.  Upon the return of the eBook, the formatting will be restored to the lender’s specification with all notes and highlights intact.  Any adjustment made by the recipient will not be seen to the lender.

There are some limitations to lending an eBook.  You can only lend a title once…ever.  Lending can only happen to one person one time.  Once you have lent the book, the recipient will have 7 days to accept the book from the date that the email was sent.  Once the recipient has accepted the eBook, they will have no longer than 14 days to read and return the book.  That being said, the lender cannot read the book while it is on loan to someone else.  One tip to make sure that this transaction is successful for all parties would be to plan the timing so that it is beneficial to all parties involved.

If you are the owner of a Barnes and Noble Nook, you can only lend to people you have deemed are “friends” with your nook.  Granted, you can give friend access to anyone with an email address, but you have to go through the process of asking to be friends and having the person accept friend status before lending can begin.  With the Amazon Kindle, you can lend books on the fly with just an email address.